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Will SOCOM be funding any sort of followup work, particularly for international applicants?


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Paul Musille Aug. 24, 2017, 4:35 a.m. PDT
@Peter Kazakoff
Hi Peter,

I just wanted to add some additional clarification in response to your questions. Please note that geography plays no role in the determination on winners for this challenge. All submissions will be considered based on the judging criteria set forth in the Guidelines tab.

Hope this helps and let me know if you have any other questions!

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Paul Musille Aug. 23, 2017, 9:25 a.m. PDT
@Peter Kazakoff
Thanks for the questions Peter. Regardless of the geography of submitted ideas for the challenge, there is no commitment of follow up or funding.

For this challenge entries from all allowable geographies will be considered equally for a prize.

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fulygan fulyganoff Aug. 23, 2017, 12:34 a.m. PDT
That you could count on further cooperation, you must, in addition to the competition, have permission under US law. For example, you are not a citizen of a country with which cooperation is prohibited ...
So I repeat again - refer to this contest as a narrow profile advertising campaign - if the USCCOM wishes to cooperate with you - it will find a way to do it.
It's best if you patent your decision and then offer it to USSOCOM or DARPA - you will be able to receive dividends
And do not forget to go through the site of NASA - maybe it has long been used https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/cubesats/index.html

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Peter Kazakoff Aug. 22, 2017, 3:15 p.m. PDT
@fulygan fulyganoff

Except the guidelines state:

"Viable for a prototype demonstration within 12-24 months"

and

"Potential future challenges may ask competitors to design, develop, and implement concept submissions entered in this challenge."

Clearly the sponsor intends to have good ideas built. However, I can't see this happening easily due to ITAR and similar for non-US applicants. Therefore, do international applicants even stand a chance at winning? Logically SOCOM should select only US teams since those are the ones that can be funded & built.

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fulygan fulyganoff Aug. 22, 2017, 1 a.m. PDT
Treat this challenge as a special form of advertising campaign

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Peter Kazakoff Aug. 22, 2017, 12:46 a.m. PDT
This challenge appears to be a leaf of some of the work that SOCOM's been doing in cubesats (such as the Prometheus constellation designed by LANL in 2014).

Does SOCOM intend to follow up with winners for actual build + flight if one or more of the winners significantly satisfy SOCOM's goals? If so, how does this look funding-wise? I know SOCOM previously did a SBIR round on this exact topic (DoD SBIR solicitation 2017.1, topic # SOCOM17-003), but SBIR is a US government initiative open only to US companies.

As this is an international competition, is there any chance of international winners being considered for a funding round to build the satellite, or would this be something open to US applicants only?

As a sidebar, how does this competition address ITAR concerns? Non-Americans will not be able to access significant technical information, such as the Prometheus interface definition if designing a payload to fit in SOCOM's existing bus. To me this sounds like a serious non-starter for non-US teams.